Monthly Archives: October 2013

National Building Museum Haunted House Pop-Ups

National Building Museum Interior, Washington, D.C.Pop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling Museum

Halloween pop-ups were the theme this past Sunday afternoon in my parent/child workshop at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C.  I began by guiding participants through basic pop-up construction steps. Then the kids (and their parents) took off on their own, building all manner of spooky edifices and populating them with vampires, spiders, bats and monsters, ghosts and ghouls. By the end of the workshop the fright level was palpable — just in time for an end-of-workshop scary story read by education director Sally Otis and some Halloween treats to take home. Here are photos of the results…

Pop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling MuseumPop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling Museum

Pop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling MuseumPop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling MuseumPop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling Museum

Pop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling MuseumPop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling MuseumPop-Up Haunted House Workshop, National Buidling Museum

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Bookbinding Visitors from the U.K.

Michael, Dominic and Carol Barton

This year, the Guild of Bookworkers Standards Conference was held in Washington, D.C., so all of my bookmaking friends were in town. Dominic Riley and Michael Burke came two days early and stayed with us in Glen Echo. (Yes, we’re a little out of focus after several glasses of wine.) We spent Thursday afternoon visiting museums, and on Saturday I did a little shopping at the vendors’ market, buying one of Shanna Leno’s beautiful leather book weights.

Terry Belanger receiving award at Guild of Bookworkers Standards Banquet Jana Dambrosio with her mini pop-up Washington Monument, Guild of Standards Banquet

Saturday evening, Dominic and Michael had me as their guest at the Guilds’ banquet and auction. Terry Belanger, founder of the University of Virginia’s Rare Book School, received the Guild’s distinguished member award. Also shown is Jana Dambrosio, a former student in one of my workshops, with her mini pop-up Washington monument. The auction was a big success, and everyone is looking forward to next year’s conference in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Pop-Up Illustrations created at MICA, Baltimore

  Illustration student with pop-up project at Maryland Institute College of Art Illustration student with pop-up project at Maryland Institute College of Art 
It’s always fun for me to teach paper engineering to a class of illustration students, especially those at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. These students jumped right in with their own illustrations and started pushing them into three dimensions using the pop-up prop structure. By the end of three short hours we had a room full of exciting pop-up model illustrations, and a lot of excitement and ideas for pushing the form further within future projects. Thank you to acting MFA program director Jaime Zollars  for again inviting me to be a part of her class.

Carol Barton's pop-up workshop for MICA illustration class  Illustration student with pop-up project at Maryland Institute College of Art
Pop-up illustration by MICA MFA studentillustration by MICA MFA student

National Technology Leadership Summer, Washington, DC

American Association of Celleges of Teacher Education Building, Washington, DCNational Museum of Women in the Arts

Sitting just across the street from each other  in downtown Washington, D.C., is the America Association of Colleges of Teacher Education building and the National Museum of Women in the Arts. This year’s National Technology Leadership Summit took advantage of this spacial proximity with a special program for the fifteen attending national education association presidents on Wednesday evening at the museum.

Carol Barton's NTLS presentation at National Museum of Women in the Arts

NMWA education director Deborah Gaston and I showed artists’ books from the library collection, and I gave a brief hands-on paper engineering session for the presidents, who seemed happy to relax and play after a day of travel. From there we proceeded to a delicious dinner at Ceiba Restaurant which specializes in Latin American cuisine.

National Technology Leadership Summit 2013 Motor project

The next day the summit began in earnest with the presidents joined by editors from educational technology journals, directors of non-profit foundations, and technology industry representatives. There were 3D printers and digital die-cutters scattered around the conference room, and in the afternoon we broke into teams and took a stab at designing a tiny motor from a given box of batteries, wire, magnets, and miscellaneous parts. Although we discovered that none of those on my team completely understood how a motor worked, the resulting discussion about the distinctions between teaching science and engineering, and  how to ensure that classroom projects really did serve to teach STEAM principles was enlightening.

I’m looking forward to ongoing discussions resulting from this year’s summit, and to more exciting ideas for the summit next year. (By that time, the government should be up and running again).